How well do you remember the very first episode of Happy Days?

Can you go ''All the Way'' without missing a question?

Happy Days arrived on January 15, 1974. The sitcom took a loving look back at the youth culture of the Fifties. 

The series kicked off with "All the Way," a coming-of-age comedy of errors that saw Richie Cunningham going on a date with a more experienced girl. Naturally, his pals Potsie, Ralph and the Fonz were there to help him out — or get in the way.

Let's see how well you remember this nostalgic premiere!

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  1. What is the name of the high school that Richie and his friends attend? It's written on the back of their letter jackets.
  2. Richie says that he is currently in which grade of high school?
  3. Does Fonzie wear a leather jacket in this episode?
  4. Does Fonzie speak at all in this episode?
  5. What is the name of Richie's older brother?
  6. What is the name of the drive-in in the first episode?
  7. Ralph Malph is a member of which gang? Their name is printed on the back of their red jackets.
  8. What does Fonzie remove from the radiator in the bathroom?
  9. What is the name of Richie's date?
  10. What book does Richie read to his date?
  11. What sport does Richie play in the episode?
  12. Which Reiner was a writer on this premiere episode?

How well do you remember the very first episode of Happy Days?

Your Result...

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terrisue 7 days ago
Not bad sinse in was only a month old when it premiered
STTOS 24 days ago
You got 10 out of 12. Aaaayyyy! Thumbs up! Should have been 11. I guessed Sophmore and missed on #2. And for #12 I knew it was Rob but fat-fingered Carl. I hate when that happens. What a meathead I am.
Runeshaper 26 days ago
7/12 - don’t recall much of the 1st episode, but I love the show!
Mike 27 days ago
9 of 12. better than I thought I would do. I guessed a few times.
MrBill 29 days ago
11/12; I blew the question on Fonzie speaking. I forgot he spoke at the end.
ncadams27 30 days ago
I’m not a fan of the “filmed before a live audience” shows. Everybody tries to upstage everyone else and see who gets the loudest applause when they make their first appearance.

They could have filmed drama shows before a live audience, with them yelling “He’s got a gun”, “Look out behind you”, and “Ouch - that’s gotta hurt”.
Wiseguy ncadams27 28 days ago
The third season was good, probably the series' best. It wasn't until the fourth season that the writers started putting Fonzie first and the audience started screaming every time he appeared.
frances3agape 1 month ago
Ohhhhh.. so ASHAMED of myself !
only 7 of 12, which is a mere 58%
FAILING GRADE - flunked out of Jefferson High (which I DID get correct)
FLETCH 1 month ago
7 out of 12...not bad considering I havent seen this episode in years
Jon 1 month ago
Kathy O'Dare, who played Mary Lou Milligan, around the same time played a date for Peter Brady.
Bartron53 1 month ago
I don’t see anyone mentioning that the first episode of ‘Happy Days’ was actually a segment on ‘Love American Style’.
abuadamin Bartron53 1 month ago
WoW!!! I appreciate that fun fact... Thank You!!! 🙂
frances3agape Bartron53 1 month ago
Yes, I was a junior in HS when it was on LAStyle in 1972 and a freshman at college when HDays series began in 1974.
The network really hustled getting HDays created and on the air.
2 interesting tidbits per imdb:
* "Happy Days (1974) was not a direct spin-off of this show, but an indirect one. Garry Marshall pitched a show to ABC called "New Family in Town". The network turned it down. So Marshall did a vignette on an episode of this show with the three characters. Two years later, American Graffiti (1973) became an unexpected success. The network remembered Marshall's show. It asked him to shoot a pilot with some changes. It wanted a gangster-type character to intimidate Cunningham. Thus, the birth of Fonzie."
* https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0063925/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0
under PHOTOS, the 5th one has a pic of HARRISON FORD in LAStyle in 1969!
MrBill Bartron53 29 days ago
The first episode of Season 1 of the Happy Days TV series was not from Love American Style. An earlier pilot was made in 1972 and was not picked up. The pilot was then used as a segment on Love American Style and picked up two years later after the popularity of American Graffiti. The pilot was never used as an episode for the 1974 TV series. Only Ron Howard, Anson Williams and Marion Ross appear in both the pilot and the TV series. The roles of Howard, Joanie and Chuck were recast and Fonzie and Ralph Malph were added for the TV series. Chuck was dropped without explanation after season 2.
Wiseguy Bartron53 28 days ago
Because it's not true. It's an episode of Love American Style. Just as the episode that shows the Jeffersons moving into their apartment is an episode of All in the Family.
Wiseguy MrBill 28 days ago
Chuck may have not made any appearances after the Christmas show of the second season, but when that very episode was rerun from 1975 to 1977, Fonzie acknowledged the existence of the character to Arnold (and later Al) when telling the story of that episode in a new scene for that rerun. Do those scenes exist on the DVDs or reruns or are they lost?
JamesB 1 month ago
I liked the first season of "Happy Days" as it seemed like the 1950's. Another nice feature of the first season was that it didn't use a studio audience. I know that Garry Marshall preferred a live audience instead of laugh tracks "of dead people laughing" (his words), but seemed like his shows that used live audiences (Happy Days, Laverne & Shirley, The Odd Couple, etc.) had the actors shouting their lines instead of speaking them. This made it seem like a staged show instead of a scripted program. Andy Griffith actually refused to convert his show to use a studio audience, as he felt it would ruin the quieter conversational quality that made The Andy Griffith Show so special. I agree with Andy!
Wiseguy JamesB 28 days ago
Also, on The Odd Couple, that first season of non-audience episodes used the same set as the movie so there was some continuity there. They had to redesign the set so the audience could see every room.
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